savoir | francusko - engleski prevod

savoir

muški rod

Definicija:

1. Connaissance.
2. Science.

Prevedi savoir na:

srpski · nemački

erudition

imenica
/ erədɪʃn̩ /

Definicija:

ETYM Latin eruditio: cf. French érudition.
1. The act of instructing.
2. The result of thorough instruction.
3. The state of being erudite or learned.
4. Learning in literature or criticism, as distinct from the sciences; scholarship.

Sinonimi:

encyclopaedism · encyclopedism · eruditeness · learnedness · learning · scholarship


know-how

imenica
/ noʊ haʊ /

Definicija:

The (technical) knowledge and skill required to do something. know how


knowledge

imenica
/ nɑːlədʒ /

Definicija:

ETYM Old Eng. knowlage, knowlege, knowleche, knawleche. The last part is the Icel. suffix -leikr, forming abstract nouns, orig. the same as Icel. leikr game, play, sport, akin to as. lâc, Goth. laiks dance. Related to Know, Lake, Lark a frolic.
1. The condition of knowing.
2. The breadth of one's understanding.
3. Learning in general.
4. Sexual intercourse; carnal knowledge.
Awareness of or familiarity with something or someone, or confidence in the accuracy of a fact or other information. Knowledge is often defined as justified true belief, although philosophers dispute what would count as justification here, and some philosophers have argued that knowledge does not involve but replaces belief. The philosophy of knowledge is epistemology.
For Plato, knowledge is of the Forms, or universals, whereas belief is of changing, material things. For English philosopher John Locke, knowledge is “the perception of the agreement or disagreement of two ideas”. French mathematician René Descartes thought his “cogito ergo sum”/“I think, therefore I am” was an item of certain knowledge. English philosopher Gilbert Ryle contrasts knowing how and knowing that: moral knowledge is knowing how to behave, whereas factual knowledge is knowing that something is the case.

Sinonimi:

cognition · noesis


science

imenica
/ saɪəns /

Definicija:

ETYM French, from Latin scientia, from sciens, -entis, p. pr. of scire to know. Related to Conscience, Conscious, Nice.
1. A particular branch of scientific knowledge; SYN. scientific discipline.
2. Any domain of knowledge accumulated by systematic study and organized by general principles; SYN. scientific knowledge.
Any systematic field of study or body of knowledge that aims, through experiment, observation, and deduction, to produce reliable explanation of phenomena, with reference to the material and physical world.
Activities such as healing, star-watching, and engineering have been practiced in many societies since ancient times. Pure science, especially physics (formerly called natural philosophy), had traditionally been the main area of study for philosophers. The European scientific revolution between about 1650 and 1800 replaced speculative philosophy with a new combination of observation, experimentation, and rationality.
Today, scientific research involves an interaction among tradition, experiment and observation, and deduction. The subject area called philosophy of science investigates the nature of this complex interaction, and the extent of its ability to gain access to the truth about the material world. It has long been recognized that induction from observation cannot give explanations based on logic. In the 20th century Karl Popper has described scientific method as a rigorous experimental testing of a scientist’s ideas or hypotheses (see hypothesis). The origin and role of these ideas, and their interdependence with observation, have been examined, for example, by the us thinker Thomas S Kuhn, who places them in a historical and sociological setting. The sociology of science investigates how scientific theories and laws are produced, and questions the possibility of objectivity in any scientific endeavor. One controversial point of view is the replacement of scientific realism with scientific relativism, as proposed.
By Paul K Feyerabend. Questions concerning the proper use of science and the role of science education are also restructuring this field of study.
Science is divided into separate areas of study, such as astronomy, biology, geology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics, although more recently attempts have been made to combine traditionally separate disciplines under such headings as life sciences and earth sciences. These areas are usually jointly referred to as the natural sciences. Physics and chemistry are sometimes separated out and called the physical sciences, with mathematics left in a category of its own. The application of science for practical purposes is called technology. Social science is the systematic study of human behavior, and includes such areas as anthropology, economics, psychology, and sociology. One area of contemporary debate is whether the social-science disciplines are actually sciences; that is, whether the study of human beings is capable of scientific precision or prediction in the same way as natural science is seen to be.

Sinonimi:

scientific discipline · skill


wisdom

imenica
/ wɪzdəm /

Definicija:

ETYM AS. wîsdôm. Related to Wise, and -dom.
1. Ability to apply knowledge or experience or understanding or common sense and insight; SYN. sapience.
2. Accumulated knowledge or erudition or enlightenment.
3. The quality of being prudent and sensible; SYN. wiseness, soundness.
4. The trait of utilizing knowledge and experience with common sense and insight; SYN. wiseness.


savoir | francusko - engleski prevod

savoir

glagolgramatika

Definicija:

1. Connaître. Savoir le latin.
2. Pouvoir.
3. Ętre capable de. Savoir conduire.
4. Prévoir. Savoir l'avenir.

Prevedi savoir na:

srpski · nemački

know how to

glagolgramatika
/ ˈnoʊ ˈhaʊ tuː /


know

glagolgramatika
/ ˈnoʊ /

Definicija:

(Homonym: no).
(Irregular preterit, past participle: knew, known).
1. To know the nature or character of.
2. To have fixed in the mind.
3. To perceive as familiar.
4. To be familiar or acquainted with a person or an object.
5. To have firsthand knowledge of states, situations, emotions, or sensations; SYN. experience, live.
6. To know how to do or perform something.
7. To be cognizant or aware of a fact or a specific piece of information; possess knowledge or information about; SYN. cognize.
8. To be aware of the truth of something; have a belief or faith in something; regard as true beyond any doubt.
9. To be able to distinguish or recognize as being different.

Sinonimi:

acknowledge · bang · be intimate · bed · bon · cognise · cognize · do it · eff · experience · get it on · get laid · have a go at it · have intercourse · have it away · have it off · have sex · hump · jazz · lie with · live · love · make love · make out · recognise · recognize · roll in the hay · screw · sleep with


savvy

glagolgramatika
/ sævi /

Definicija:

Understand

Sinonimi:

apprehen · compass · comprehend · dig · get the picture · grasp · grok


understand

glagolgramatika
/ ˌʌndərˈstænd /

Definicija:

(Irregular preterit, past participle: understood).
1. To perceive mentally, as of an idea; SYN. realize, see.
2. To know and comprehend the nature or meaning of.
3. To make sense of a language, although one may not be able to produce it; SYN. read, interpret, translate.
4. To believe to be the case; SYN. gather, infer.


Da li ste možda tražili neku od sledećih reči?

safari | saphir | sauver | sauveur | saveur | se faire | se fier ŕ | sévère | sévir | se voir | se vouer | soufre | sphère | suffire | suivre

Reč dana

Patterson

imenica, geografija

bombon

muški rod, kulinarstvo

Plektron

imenica, muzika

distal

pridev, anatomija

25.06.2022.